FROM A VENETIAN GARDEN, 2018.
PHOTOGRAPHY © ZAIRA ZAROTTI, THE FREAKY TABLE.

“Ancient Greeks invented the words

gastronomy and geometry, in their effort

to define and expand their dimensions

of taste and space, respectively.”

DIMITRIS PANAGIOTIDIS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The etymology of gastronomy revolves around the words gastér (stomach) and nómos (the rule of law) and therefore, means the “art or law of the stomach”. Essentially, gastronomy is related to the “art of the table” and delineates food as culture, art and a pleasurable process that can elevate the earthly human experience. Simultaneously, geometry etymologically is derived from the two words géo (earth) and métron (measurement) and aims to explore the dimensions of shapes, sizes, figures and the physical properties of tangible matters. Since the birth of its axiomatic form by its father Euclid, it has evolved and served human civilization throughout the centuries. In the modern world, geometrical elements are used in the artwork of many artists, as well as designers and the scope of geometry ceases to only define tangible space, but seeks to reinvent it, as well. The merging of these two Greek words comprises Gastrometry.

Gastrometry aims to explore how pioneering geometrical designs and ideas evolve the modern sensualization of the dining experience, as well as how the heavenly art of savour inspires professionals to reinvent the perception and utility of all the goods associated with the act of rejoicing into food. A multicultural culinary art gallery, whose scope is to present an exclusive selection of interiors, premium products, contemporary applied and culinary arts, as well as creative people.

© 2018 Gastrometry. All rights reserved.

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